Does SiteSpect offer different packages and pricing?

Does SiteSpect offer different packages and pricing?

Yes. We offer several packages and pricing structures for our best-in-class solutions. Please contact us for details.

DOES SITESPECT PROVIDE TESTING FOR THE CUSTOMER JOURNEY ACROSS DEVICES?

DOES SITESPECT PROVIDE TESTING FOR THE CUSTOMER JOURNEY ACROSS DEVICES?

SiteSpect’s omnichannel capability ensures consistent, targeted experiences for returning digital customers across traditional web and mobile browsers.

DOES SITESPECT ALLOW TESTING OF NATIVE MOBILE APPS AND MOBILE WEB CONTENT IN ONE EXPERIENCE?

DOES SITESPECT ALLOW TESTING OF NATIVE MOBILE APPS AND MOBILE WEB CONTENT IN ONE EXPERIENCE?

SiteSpect allows companies to optimize mobile sites and apps built using traditional, responsive, and adaptive design, as well as those developed as a single-page app or native application. Click here for more information on mobile testing.

HOW DOES SITESPECT AFFECT PAGE LOAD TIMES DURING TESTING?

HOW DOES SITESPECT AFFECT PAGE LOAD TIMES DURING TESTING?

SiteSpect’s processing overhead is normally measured in single- or double-digit milliseconds (typically 4ms to 12ms) per page view. This contrasts with JavaScript tag-based web optimization solutions, which may substantially lengthen page load times. The more JavaScript and general third-party scripts on a web page, the slower the page loads. For more information on the impact of JavaScript tagging on the user experience, download our whitepaper.

WHAT IS “FLICKER” AND WHY DOES IT OCCUR DURING TESTING?

WHAT IS “FLICKER” AND WHY DOES IT OCCUR DURING TESTING?

With tests using JavaScript tags, the images being tested often load twice and flicker as a result. For visitors, this means the original page content is visible for a short time before the testing script changes it, leaving visitors disoriented and presenting a poor brand image to customers and prospects. In contrast, SiteSpect generates test pages directly, without JavaScript tags, so visitors won’t see a disconcerting flicker and users won’t know the page is being tested. The alternative to flicker for JavaScript tags is to wait for the new content (via a synchronous call), which will add significant latency.

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF TESTING WITH SITESPECT’S SOLUTION VERSUS A TAG-BASED SOLUTION?

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF TESTING WITH SITESPECT’S SOLUTION VERSUS A TAG-BASED SOLUTION?

Reverse proxy technology is common in network infrastructures where speed and performance are critical. This method, while unique for website optimization, is most likely already implemented on many current sites in the form of Content Distribution Networks (CDNs), such as Akamai or EdgeCast. SiteSpect’s reverse proxy architecture doesn’t require JavaScript tags, which affect the speed and performance of web pages. Key performance benefits of testing with SiteSpect’s reverse proxy architecture include:

The ability to test any page element: There is no limit to the type of content a team can modify when inspecting a web server’s response. In contrast to the use of JavaScript tags, SiteSpect allows testing of any type of content, including dynamic content. The ability to test non-HTML content is critical for modern sites that use Ajax, including single-page apps.

Fast test creation: Unlike the alternatives, SiteSpect’s tag-free solution doesn’t require any changes to the HTML or programming code that drives websites. This approach allows optimization teams to spend less time setting up tests.

More tests per user: The number of tests in which a user can participate is not limited by the power of the user’s browser. Tag-based testing approaches force a user’s browser to execute JavaScript for every individual test or targeted experience. Every change requires the user’s browser to run more JavaScript.

DOES SITESPECT USE A ONE-TAIL OR TWO-TAIL T-TEST FOR MEASURING STATISTICAL SIGNIFICANCE, AND WHY?

DOES SITESPECT USE A ONE-TAIL OR TWO-TAIL T-TEST FOR MEASURING STATISTICAL SIGNIFICANCE, AND WHY?

Since its inception, SiteSpect has focused on delivering a powerful product true to the statistical nature of experimental design. There are two common techniques used to measure statistical significance: one-tailed tests and two-tailed tests. Different vendors use different techniques. Essentially, one-tailed tests consider only the positive impact of changes. Two-tailed tests consider both the positive and negative impacts. Using a two-tailed test in website optimization provides a more complete picture of the impact of a change. SiteSpect uses two-tailed T-tests as the basis for its calculations.